From Knowing to Doing – Developing Feedback Fluency of Future Leaders

In this semester’s Leadership and Management skills course I was looking for ways that would enable students to dig in deeper and stretch their learning. Each four hour session is designed to be experiential and learning is facilitated by using a combination of virtual simulations, reflection, applying the flipped classroom method, role play, assessments, working out loud and practicing participatory leadership tools.

A key skill set that I have noticed is often lacking in the management domain is the ability to give feedback in a timely and constructive manner.

Working with a class of 24 students from 12 countries you can imagine the differences in perspectives related to this skill. For example:

  • From my point of view, a feedback is connected with negative emotions and taking criticism personally, not on the work that one does.
  • I grew up in a culture where giving feedback is not the norm. Or if someone is giving you “Feedback”, it it’s usually to make you feel bad or prove they’re better than you are.
  • In my experience giving and receiving feedback were not positive experiences for me, for this reason I was scared to be involved in this process.
  • Sometimes when we give feedback towards our team members it may affect them from a personal perspective, it’s a very sensitive topic.

To create something that would truly create powerful impact with the students, I reached out to Sarah Schwab the CEO of The Experience Accelerator to ask if we could create a project together that would help the students build their feedback skills into a competence.  Sarah was open to the idea and we created a five-part learning journey for the students.

  1. It began with students logging into The Experience Accelerator to visualize a feedback virtual scenario
  2. Students were debriefed on the scenario and required to practice giving feedback and recording their interaction.
  3. Before class students received written feedback on their practice focusing on the areas they had performed well in as well as suggestions on how they could improve.
  4. At this point the learning went live and students had the opportunity in class to practice by giving, receiving and observing feedback in different scenarios that had been prepared for them. Watch the video
  5. And finally, students were given the opportunity to write a reflection about what they learned over the course of the assignment

In their reflection papers students expressed their surprise at the power of the exercise:

“I have learned that feedback is not about telling what the person did right or wrong, but about explaining how he or she made the other person feel.” KB

“I realized again how challenging it is when performing the online scenario where it somehow appeared easy when watching the video, but was a totally different story when I had to do my own recordings.” ME

“I would like to say that such an experience was truly helpful for me. I gained a lot of knowledge in terms of feedback, particularly if I want to give an effective feedback, I should always practice and be aware of some key points in order to avoid making mistakes from the very beginning.” SK

Their ability to put into practice a four step feedback model*  both virtually and in class during live role play has categorically changed the beliefs’ students had about feedback. Furthermore they now have a toolkit and clear understanding of how to deliver effective constructive feedback.

*Clarify the context, explain using as much detail as possible what happened, explain the impact their action had on the situation and discuss possible steps on how to move forward.

Author:

Nadene Canning, BSL Professor

 

Innovation at BSL: MEDICLY – A transparent blockchain healthcare system

Edited by Dr. Aileen Ionescu-Somers, Gap Frame Week designer and orchestrator

Student Group 1: Mariam Rawashdeh, Alexandra Gritsenko, Abdulkader AL Muhaidib, Andre Linney, Edoardo Danisi, Conrad Zawadzki, Mathieu Feltzinger, Grigory Klyuev, Tarek Talaat

DAY 1 – Ideation

Here we go, dear Readers; we are starting our Spring 2018 Gap Frame Week journey and this is our blog. Our group experience began with everyone introducing himself or herself and sharing personal insights. Out of the 8 members of our group, we had 7 different nationalities. This diversity helped us to get many initial ideas (80, to be precise) and different points of view.

We then discussed personal stories from our countries in connection to the health topic that we had unanimously chosen. What emerged is that health is certainly a multifaceted issue with many issues that need to be addressed. For example, we found during our research that even in developed countries, abuse and misinformation linked to use of medication is prevalent. What do guys think ? Is this a real issue?

While we talked, project ideas started to take shape, such as creating a transparent block chain healthcare system in which hospitals and pharmacies worldwide would be able to access the health background of virtually any patient. We discussed the pros and cons of a concept we called MEDICLY whereby any medical center or pharmacy across the globe could have access to an individual’s health record. The idea seemed appealing but we debated about the challenges of applying such an idea worldwide. For example, we established that there would be knowledge and communication barriers. Since we realized that applying this idea worldwide would be an immense challenge, we decide to stay at a country level, and to focus on Poland.

DAY 2 – Flexing of ideas

Let’s start the second day ! Our first task of the day was to identify relevant stakeholders. We then had to decide on some strategies to explore the feasibility of our Day 1 ideas.

The stakeholders we researched were Customers of companies, Cities & communities. Financial institutions, Consumers, Government and Regulators.

Customers of companies

We interviewed a pharmacist who was delighted with the idea and told us he would agree to take part in such a the project if it were launched. He found it simple, obvious and beneficial not only for the pharmaceutical business but for the entire health-care system.

Cities & communities

For cities & communities we sent an email to a local commune asking them about their opinions regarding the project, whether they would implement it in their commune and whether it is beneficial to them ? We also asked how it could work with local and Swiss regulations (knowing that in Switzerland, each commune is different).

Financial institutions

For financial institutions we interviewed an investor. The interviewed person said that he is observing a tremendous shift in technology and a tendency towards dealing with finance in very different ways (such as cryptocurrency). Medical health-care is an important aspect of human social existence and well-being. In his view, inefficiencies in the healthcare system inevitably translate into big problems for society. The investor we interviewed said that he believes in our idea and could see a future scenario where it may be possible to introduce it.

Consumer

For a consumer perspective, we interviewed fellow students of BSL and staff. The questions we asked were:

  • Do you think the current system of medical prescriptions is fair and functional?
  • Have you ever had any issues in trying to retrieve your or others medical records?
  • Do you know your blood type? If yes, do you have the blood type card with u at all times?
  • Do you know you if you have any allergies?
  • Do you think medical prescriptions are currently too easy or hard to get?

We concluded from the interviews that we had identified a problematic issue. People thought the idea was good but that there would probably be issues to solve regarding the handling of personal information and cloud safety (cybersecurity).

Government and Regulators

For governments & regulators, our team member contacted the Polish Health Ministry. We are still waiting for an answer….oh well…..you can’t win them all!

DAY 3 – Prototyping our concept

Today, we presented our project to all the students and faculty in the main auditorium. We got questions on how could we safely store patient data, and we had an interesting discussion around the block chain idea. Later in the day, we moved on to prototyping our idea. First, we carried out more research to get data that are more concrete and we decided to focus on the U.S. rather than Poland. Second, we shared all the information that different members of the team had been working on, combining and structuring our resources.

Back in our innovation space after our lunch break, we started working on the 10-prototyping criteria provided. We also made some decisions about what our slogan should be. Options we considered were: “partner in life”, “accessibility”, “partner for health”, “private health directory”, and we settled on the latter.

Once we finished the answers we went over the work done and refreshed everything for the opportunity we would have the next day to share our ideas with others and build on them (we call this session the “Frenzy”).

DAY 4 – Refining our prototype

Dear Readers: Here is the last part of our Spring 2018 Gap Frame Week blog!!! On this – the 4th day – we started organizing and planning for the Frenzy. We created posters and finalized the presentation, We even spoke with one of the other groups working on a health challenge also. We discovered that we had synergies and that seeking a partnership with the other student team might even make sense.

During the Frenzy we gave each other feedback. Our fellow students were highly engaged and gave many positive comments.

However, other students really wanted to understand how to ensure a sustainable flow of funding for the project once the program is sold to, for example, the government. We definitely need to focus on the funding model at our next Gap Frame Week in the Summer of 2018.

Once we integrated the feedback, we finished the presentation by adding our draft financial plan.

Phew…..we were finally done! Our team presenter rehearsed in front of everyone as, on the Friday – final day – we would only be allowed an 8 minute presentation. Wish us luck!!

 

Innovation at BSL: NAVINTA – Matching University students with rural communities in need

Edited by: Dr. Aileen Ionescu-Somers, Gap Frame Week designer and orchestrator

Blogpost by BSL Spring Gap Frame Week Student Group 5: Adelaide-Ioli
Eliopoulos, Arshia Soltani, David Chopuuryan, Jose Carreras-Medina, Moulaye El
Hassen, Nikita Safronov, Oleksandr Kryachko, Saveliy Danilov, Suchi Dubey

“Education is the passport to the future,
for tomorrow belongs to those who prepare for it today.”

-Malcolm X

This blog is mainly devoted to the teamwork issues related to our experience ofΣτιγμιότυπο 2018-05-03, 9.53.42 π.μ.
the Gap Frame Week (GFW) that has become such an essential part of the BSL community life. During this highly innovative week, we raise important questions about some of the world’s greatest environmental and social challenges. We share, reflect upon, and discuss possible solutions to these dilemmas, AND we develop a prototype of a solution. Being honest, sometimes we even get quite carried away and there are lots of different opinions – sometimes even raised voices – amongst the team members.

As Team 5, we decided to focus during the Spring 2018 GFW on the lack of equal opportunity for education and self-development. We came up with the idea of Navinta, which is the creation of a knowledge database using algorithm software to match University students with rural communities in need, and to empower them as educators of elementary school students. In order to create a successful concept prototype, which would contribute to equal opportunity for education, we needed to work as a team, as one organism. This short blog entry will talk about our experience during the week, our team chemistry and the way we worked together.

Our overall conclusion from our GFW experience is that the key to team success
lies in the creation of an original community, where everyone’s ideas are valued and represented. In order to find the right group chemistry, it is essential to get to know
each other, and to learn to respect each team member. Luckily,Στιγμιότυπο 2018-05-03, 9.56.15 π.μ. every member of our team knew each other before working on this project, but we were not very close. Therefore, we had to get to know each other better so we could operate better. The “Ice breaker” activity on the first day helped us to achieve this. The “Ice breaker” is an easy exercise, in which team members interview and introduce each other. It consists of 5 questions, to be answered by each team member within one minute each. During this session, even though we already knew each other, we still connected on another level. During the icebreaker time, we each drew symbols that represented the others (their characters and personalities, or what we knew about them). Even though it seemed as a simple task, we found it to be quite challenging. These symbols revealed a lot about each member of the group and helped us to get a better understanding of each other. Every member shared what he/she meant by the symbol, the idea and the meaning behind it. It was a crucial step on our way to finding the perfect team chemistry.

Respect, listening skills, and commitment (with an added ingredient of humor) in what we believe are necessary tools to create a warm and productive working atmosphere. The fact that we had a chance to self-organize as a team, had an immensely positive impact on our working process. Everything we did during the GFW, even when we were procrastinating, researching, interviewing, developing our posters or presentations, watching or making videos or even…. dancing, helped us to connect and as a result we feel we presented an inspired piece of work on the final day of the week.

Even after the working days were over, some of our team members met up, went out together, had dinner, and had some fun, which all helped up to bond even more. Even though those activities were not connected to the work at all – during the time we went out we did not talk about our project at all – it still had a positive effect on the chemistry of our team and we were able to work better together the following day.

At the end of the day, there really is no “I” in team and it  is crucial that every team member understands that. We are convinced that nothing is more vital to success than the team spirit.Στιγμιότυπο 2018-05-03, 9.57.42 π.μ.

In this blogpost, we have not talked
much about our solution, preferring to report on some of the team building aspects of the week. But watch this space for more news about NAVINTA and how it develops when we work on it further during GFW 4 from 14 to 20 May, 2018.

Until then, signing out, Group 5!

 

 

Innovating with BSL: THE TAG – Keeping tags on our health with meaningful labels

Edited by Dr. Aileen Ionescu-Somers

Blog Post by GFW Group 7 BSL students: Arman Danielyan, Karina Bondarenko, Karina Grigoryeva, Khalid Attieh, Lidiya Kudina, Morgan Manin, Omar Eltanani, Timofei Plahotniuci, Ulysse Ortiz

 

Day 1

During our Spring 2018 Gapframe Innovation week, our group opted to work on “Quality of Life”. We found three main sub-themes to develop further: Education, Nutrition, and Peace & Stability. We then developed each of them by coming up with solution ideas using a design-thinking ideation exercise. Overall, we felt we could get most group traction around the Nutrition and Education themes. Can you believe that we came up with 80 different ideas?

Day 2

In the morning, our group discussed possible project ideas. Maybe surprisingly, we did not choose any of the original 80 ideas. Sleeping on it clearly brought inspiration because we actually came up with a brand new idea: “Health labeling for food” on two levels: for illiterate people and for already developed countries. We felt that if we designed a concept in this area, we could have impact globally. Click HERE for a very short video showing the general idea.

According to our research, health labelling is relevant for almost everybody. It not only informs those who are health conscious, but also those unaware of the food they are eating. Nowadays, too few people actually scrutinize the ingredients and nutritional value of the food they are buying. Could our solution provide an easy and non time-consuming way of checking these factors?

Our team came up with a cool solution: to put colorful labels on products, so that it is super easy to check whether the product being purchased is really healthy. The symbols relate to the levels of sugar, chemicals, salt, wheat, lactose, conserving agents.

On Day 2, we researched 5 main stakeholder groups: media, customers, thought leaders, cities & communities, government & regulators. We carried out interviews to benchmark the feedback and drawbacks of our project. We concluded from the feedback we got that the project was promising and interesting and that we should continue developing it. We defined our mission statement as follows: “We provide a simplified and understandable labelling system to evaluate how healthy food products are, allowing even the illiterate to link health risks or benefits to the food they eat.”

Day 3

Having presented our idea and the product to the other groups in the morning, we realized that we needed to be more specific with the labelling objective. For example, to look at the possibility of product labeling for blind people, or to concentrate on people with specific diseases, and for whom food has an important impact, such as those with digestive disorders, depression, obesity, heart / kidney diseases, diabetes, inflammation, osteoporosis.

Day 4

Today, we started prototyping and searching for ways of implementing our idea. Since we did not have enough time to create and personalize all the labels we wanted, we found some good options online, printed them out and stuck them to a number of products we bought. Since in our group we had a certified nutritionist, we used her knowledge to decide on which product to put what. Depending on the amount of sugar, salt, and harmful chemicals (such as aspartame in Coca Cola light), we distributed the labels on the products, using red ones to attract attention to less healthy ingredients, and green to distinguish the products that are healthy.

To set up the company, we discussed creating a Swiss association in the Swiss commercial register free of charge, with tax-free status. We also decided that launching a website made a lot of sense for our initiative, more as an awareness-building platform, to include all information related to our product and events and detailing the benefits of collaborating with us. The website and social media would be very important marketing tools. We also outlined important financial resources questions, including crowdfunding and aid agency possibilities.

Looking forward to developing this further in Gap Frame Week 3, 2018. There are many labelling initiatives out there; can we develop and outreach one that will lead to less consumer confusion and add value to society?

Innovation at BSL: GAME OVER? – Transforming the lives of the elderly

Edited by Dr. Aileen Ionescu-Somers

Blog Post by GFW Group 3 BSL students: Alexander Svetlitskiy, Amin Riaziat, Andrea Sacco, Deem Almuhaidib, Dmytro Kovtoniuk, Luis Miguel Becerra, Valentina Korobeynikova, Victor Gladskoy

Today, we are neglecting our elderly more and more as a society. Moreover, current retirement homes are not responding to the basic human communication needs of the elderly. There is also a need to incentivize the elderly to remain healthy as long as possible in both mind and body.

As Group 3 of 8 student groups overall during the Spring Gap Frame Week, we selected the “Quality of life” area of focus on Day 1 of the Gap Frame Week so that we could design a useful solution for the future. Our research on Day 2 provided us with significant insights into the “pain” of our stakeholders. By addressing the pain points identified, we felt we could provide an additional choice for the elderly to spend time in retirement, using a mobile application and developing a specialized community center for the elderly. During the rest of the week, we had a challenging time developing an early prototype of our concept, but it was a lot of fun at the same time. Click HERE to view our fun team video so that you can get a sense our positive collaborative spirit!

Our research revealed that many elderly people are suffering from loneliness. In many cases, the elderly have limited communications with other human beings and over time, they may engage in increasingly limited activities. Often, the highlight of an elderly person’s day is simply reading the newspaper. Retirement for many represents a “long wait for the inevitable”. We want to change all that by introducing an easy to use application, supported on all mobile platforms, called “Game Over?”. Our innovation aim is to create a tailor-made application that is extremely user-friendly and easy to navigate. The app would provide several functions – newspaper, TV, a net-working and communication platform, games, activity schedules and plans, with related activity sign-up sheets. Our idea is to provide an easy to use platform where the elderly can engage in a favorite activity such as reading the newspaper but also try other activities. For example, on the Game Over? App, the elderly will be able to play games especially designed to be beneficial to the health of the elderly. Playing video games increases brain stimulation, reduces arthritis, lowers the risk of Alzheimer’s, improves memory and attention, slows down the aging process, improves hand-eye coordination and helps with depression. To appeal to the target group, the design and interface of the App games will appeal specifically to the elderly.

We also discussed including a concept of related Game Over? community centers.  The idea is to provide a room for elderly citizens to enjoy gaming experiences and for those not yet initiated to gaming, provide an introduction class to new technology. Exploring our ideas further, we felt that the “Game Over?” community center could cover other aspects of elderly well-being. It could also have a meditation room and garden to hold meditation and or light yoga sessions with a meditation instructor. This would help elderly citizens learn the art of relaxation and good breathing techniques but also help retain a certain level of physical fitness. We also had the idea of equipping the community center with an emergency treatment room. Another idea was to provide a system whereby the elderly will be able to tutor young students for a profit, depending on their skills, potentially with the profit being used for our platform subscriptions. As we discussed and worked on our prototype, plenty of new ideas came up.

With the target market of elderly (aged 65+), our group felt that the App and linked community/activity center will not only make the lives of the elderly more meaningful but it will change and improve quality of life.

With Game Over?, we are reintroducing a selection of elements that complement and enhance quality of life. In our view, Game Over?, if developed fully,  has the potential to create a new found purpose in life for isolated populations of the elderly in Switzerland and outside. During the next GFW, we will be developing this prototype further, into as feasible a start-up idea as possible in order to attract the attention of potential (albeit hypothetical – for now) investors. Watch this space.

 

Innovation at BSL: Beep Saved – Technology empowering ordinary people to save lives

Edited by Dr. Aileen Ionescu-Somers

Blog post by GFW3 Spring 2018 Group 6 students: Alexandra Sommer, Alexandre Watry, Anastasia Morozava, Aswin Babu, Diego Dimartino, Kamran Hatam-Zada, Konstantin Goldenberg, Theodore Martorell, Volodymyr Kovalchuk

“One right beep – one saved life”

We are proud to invite you to read our blogpost written during the Spring Gap Frame Week 2018, when BSL students focused on coming up with solutions to some of the world’s most challenging social issues.

Many people with chronic illnesses die each year having collapsed in the street or on the way to hospital due to the lack of first aid knowledge amongst people passing by. Our research revealed that 150,000 lives could be saved in Europe yearly if passersby were able to provide effective immediate first aid. We were interested to learn that St John Ambulance research shows that 59% of interviewed people would not feel comfortable providing first aid on the street due to their own lack of knowledge (The Guardian, 2010).

In Russia, many people suffer from diseases such as epilepsy, diabetes and chronic heart disease. The overall number of Russian people with these diseases is actually 32.5 million. Therefore, there is a high risk of people collapsing on the street on a daily basis, and not receiving critical and appropriate first aid from passers-by. After our preliminary research, our Group decided to focus on providing an effective solution to this issue in Russia, a country where victims of heart attacks or other problems have a high risk of not receiving primary first aid on the street. Frequent long delays in ambulance arrivals exacerbate the problem and makes it even more important for passersby to have high awareness and good knowledge about how to act in case of emergency.

Our team came up with an idea of a wearable technology – Beep Saved – that would allow people with health conditions to be attended easily and safely in case of an emergency. Our wearable technology – worn on the wrist much like a watch – provides a panic SOS button, which identifies the emergency, immediately calls for an ambulance using GPS technology, makes a recognizable sound/alarm to attract the attention of people nearby, and provides the passerby with tailor-made first aid tips depending on the person’s health condition. The screen carefully guides the bystander through minimal step-by-step instructions to ensure that the person has as optimal a chance as possible of surviving the episode (CPR, positioning of the body, etc). Click here for a demo to show the operating principle.

To test whether we had a feasible concept, we decided to explore the perceptions of three different groups: customers, doctors, and investors. That meant that we needed to get out into the external environment and meet stakeholders so we carried out interviews in three different locations: the city center of Lausanne, the university hospital (CHUV) and at Business School Lausanne.

We prepared three different questionnaires based on qualitative and quantitative data. Afterwards we divided our group evenly, to carry out the interviews. After carefully reviewing the results, we noted that all stakeholders provided common feedback: acceptance and interest in the concept.

We enhanced our prototype ideas as a result of our research (an interactive screen, GPS for ambulance, SOS button, heart rate checker, and speaker to let passersby know that the person is in need of help). We also added the monitor idea, to show first aid tips to perform in advance of the arrival of an ambulance.

After pitching our idea to the other student groups and faculty, and receiving feedback, we came up with the final technology software prototype. Our group decided to locate this business in Russia and to produce the technology in Latvia due to the costs and legal aspects. We decided not to produce in China as wanted to create a sustainable responsible business and did not feel that outsourcing to China aligned with that vision. We carried out a competitor analysis, looking at the three most well-known similar companies from an international perspective. We focused our analysis on price, strengths and weaknesses. The most well-known comparable concept is Medical Guardian which asks for a subscription price in the market and offers simple technology; followed by Lifefone, which has similar characteristics, but expects a long term contract commitment from customers. Bay Alarm Medical is the most expensive existing solution. It offers wide customization choices and is more than seventy years in the market. Our differentiation from these potential competitors are one-time payment, no contract requirements, free delivery and installation of software, and the fact that it would be the most interactive device on the market. After the competitive analysis and examining the possible target market, we defined our product as a high quality one-time payment product.

We had an opportunity to present a draft version of our concept prototype mid-week, to share what we had learnt from other groups. Our idea received overall positive comments. To illustrate clearly the problem we were trying to solve, we showed a social experiment video filmed in Russia that demonstrated the level of ignorance and even indifference of passersby in case of someone obviously not feeling well or collapsing in the street. This video emotionally connected with many viewers and stakeholders and illustrated well the high social importance of introducing our product to the Russian market. Once other groups had commented, we reviewed the remarks made by our BSL colleagues and implemented their feedback in the development of our prototype.

“Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity” Martin Luther King Jr.

We believe that in today’s world it is crucial to reduce ignorance and encourage the notion of people and communities helping each other on every level. Our device will not only potentially save lives, but it can also have a substantial impact by improving behavior and increasing empathy. Our concept will reduce the level of ignorance and, we feel, raise awareness such that more people will want to help each other in the long run.

BSL Gap Frame Innovation Week, Spring 2018: Is the world all set for MySet?

Blog by Dr. Aileen Ionescu-Somers with video blog by Student Group 2: Anastasiya Markova, Armen Danielyan, James Polit, Julia Bogle, Mathis Chailleux, Napat Suttaponga, Umar Kalanov, Vasily Zhuraviev, Victor Marinescu.

As promised, this is the first of several blogs relating to student output from our Spring Gap Frame Week 2018 prototyping exercise. We want our readers to share in the “buzz” that these weeks create within BSL. And we hope to inspire some of you also. Please refer to this article to understand more in detail what the BSL Gap Frame Week is all about. The short explanation is that the Gap Frame Week is an opportunity for our students to work on prototyping solutions and even start-ups addressing some of the world’s most formidable sustainability dilemmas. In Spring 2018, the students tackled social issues.

Of the eight groups that presented early prototypes of solutions to world social issues, an expert faculty panel on Day 5 felt that Group 2: MySet ticked many boxes in terms of the potential outreach and impact of the idea, if marketed carefully and in the right way.

So what is the concept idea that was prototyped, MySet, all about? In innovation, the best place to start is always with the problem the solution is trying to solve. Group 2 decided to address Education as the social issue worthy of their attention. Their research indicated that students in developing countries often do not have enough seating in their school classrooms. Small children often squeeze into cramped desks, several at a time, or even have to sit on the floor to attend their classes. India is a case in point where 75% of schools in rural areas have this problem. This leads to difficulties concentrating and learning, and even to longer-term physical problems since students are forced to sit in unnatural positions.

What proposed solution did Group 2 come up with? The MySet concept proposes an affordable, light, adjustable chair set made from recycled material. If marketed to the right target audience (obviously, since parents are too poor to afford such a solution, charitable foundations, NGOs and aid agencies would be an interesting target), MySet has the potential to be an interesting proposition. Clever idea. Let’s see how Group 2 does in developing this early prototype into a full blown start-up ready to attract investor interest, with a corresponding exhibition space during our next GFW in May.

The video blog produced by the Group 2 students listed above gives an idea of the journey they took to arrive at their final prototype. Click HERE to view; enjoy!

 

Ionescu-AileenPICTURE-150x150Author: Dr. Aileen Ionescu-Somers

Gap Frame Week designer and orchestrator

BSL and innovation: Does BSL’s Gap Frame Week create value for society?

At Business School Lausanne, we are proud to offer a highly dynamic Gap Frame Week (GFW) experience to our students four times a year. What does this mean, and what happens during these weeks? Well, you might be surprised to learn that our students work in teams to co-create solutions to the world’s most problematic social, environmental, economic and governance issues. Ambitious: yes!  A tough call: yes!  But no one ever said business school should be easy. As the GFW designer, I incorporate a variety of co-creative techniques including World Café and Collaboratories to get our students thinking “out of the box”, but I have also designed the week with a strong red thread of design thinking processes throughout to encourage open innovation and create an inspirational learning context.

Click HERE for a short video of our students in action during the BSL Gap Frame Week.

Design thinking is a process whereby we seek primarily to understand the people for whom we are designing products or services. Design thinking helps us to question “norms” or fixed mindsets, challenge assumptions about “what they want”, change levels of understanding in the innovation teams, and redefine problems in order to find a better fit between “the problem” and “the solution”.  Design thinking is not only a solutions-based approach to solving problems, but also a whole way of thinking and working in itself. It is a good choice for our BSL GFW innovation week because it is so useful in helping to tackle problems that are not very well defined or are even unknown. And since during the GFW, we are tackling problems that the world’s best minds have not yet resolved, we need all the help we can get!

During each Gap Frame week, our BSL students generate new matches between solutions and needs that truly create value for society. And who knows, maybe some will carry a brilliant business idea out of BSL and create value in the real world! We encouraged our students to write blogs recounting their experiences during the last GFW in Spring 2018, so that you too can have a taste of what the students achieve.  Some great examples will be showcased in a series of blogs leading up to our next GFW from 14 to 18 May, 2018. Keep reading our blogs over the next 4 weeks!

 

Ionescu-AileenPICTURE-150x150Author: Dr. Aileen Ionescu-Somers

Gap Frame Week designer and orchestrator

Bachelor students successfully simulate Summit Conference

Conventional theories are presented and explored by our first-year students in the Bachelor of Business Administration macro-economics class. However, a substantial aspect of it considers alternative approaches to macro-economy.

The crowning of this wide-ranging approach took place during the last class of the semester, in which a global conference on sustainable development, along the lines of the United Nations Rio +20 conference, was simulated. Country representatives met in different task forces to demonstrate critical thinking and generate new ideas for solving the world’s economic challenges. Here is the inspiring outcome of their hard work.

The countries participating in the morning conference simulation were Switzerland, the Netherlands and the USA. The task forces on special topics, made up of country representatives, agreed on the following proposals:

  • Foreign Aid to reach the amount of 0.7% of GDP as proposed by the United Nations, achieved by raising the corporate income tax and re-allocating the public spending budget. Focus on food security in sub-Saharan Africa, including programs to educate farmers, because poor post-harvest handling and storage loss leads to a 10% loss of production.
  • Knowledge Transfer between MIT (USA), EPFL (CH) and Delft (NL), three science-based universities interested in innovative solutions to real-life problems. All knowledge shared will be protected by an agreement regarding Intellectual Property Rights, and the Erasmus program will be used as the framework for the exchange. In another program, knowledge could be shared on modern public transportation (from NL), space travel (from NASA in the USA) and nuclear research (from CERN in CH).
  • Climate Change to be firstly managed by increasing the use of renewable energy in the three countries mentioned above for transportation – Swiss Solar Impulse will work with Boeing (USA) and Fokker (NL) on solar-powered airplanes, and trains/buses will be promoted in the countries; secondly, by the introduction of Carbon Capture and Storage technology, developed in CH to collect CO2 emissions before they are released into the air and to re-use the stored CO2. In addition, society will be made climate-proof by being prepared for the harmful effects of climate change, e.g. flood protection.

The countries participating in the afternoon conference simulation were Chad, France and Canada. The task forces agreed on the following proposals:

  • Foreign Aid to achieve four objectives: firstly, Canada and France to channel more humanitarian aid to Chad to help feed and house the 300,000 refugees from Sudan, as well as to fight the outbreak of hepatitis E in the country. Secondly, ease visa requirements from Chad to France and Canada in order to improve work opportunities for Chadian workers – the three countries share the French language. Thirdly, France to build training bases for the Foreign Legion in Chad, which will create jobs and provide excellent training conditions for the Foreign Legion. Lastly, Chad to receive military support from France – a military school – and Canada – military equipment – in order to improve security in the region where there are numerous conflicts.
  • Knowledge Transfer to firstly raise the literacy rate in Chad from 40% today to 80% by 2030, with a program to recruit, prepare and retain teachers led by France and Canada; at the moment there are only 2 teachers per 1000 residents. Secondly, to extend the current exchange program for University of Chad students and French universities, running since 1971, to include Canadian universities. Thirdly, to install 100 MW of solar energy production by 2030 in addition to the 60 MW planned for 2020, because a good return on investment can be anticipated.
  • Climate Change agrees three objectives to deal with the serious desertification in the country and the drying up of Lake Chad, which some estimates claim has lost 95% of its water, all of which has raised tensions between the three countries making use of water from it. Firstly, to reverse the desertification, plant two million trees in addition to the 1.5 million planted by the UNHCR and use the French charity Friends of the Earth to clear away the silt in water channels. Secondly, use the Canadian charity Wateraid to improve access to clean drinking water and reduce waterborne diseases. Thirdly, to use the French charity Action Against Hunger to improve irrigation systems in the area.

The objectives and policies are marked by being linked to specific and concrete facts about the countries as well as to existing organizations and programs. Thus, the results of the simulation present an inspiring vision of what could be done for our collective future, while being practicable and realistic.

Author:

Benjamin Wall, Professor

 

Philip Morris International & Sustainable Change

Sustainability is a highly complex concept that, at times, might be hard to integrate in a business environment. However, even companies that were not built with a sustainable focus in mind can turn the leaf and make a real change. A great example illustrating sustainable change is Philip Morris International, which BSL’s Master in International Business students visited on 16th January 2018.

The morning started with warm greetings from Huub Savelkouls, Vice President of Social and Economic Affairs. After a short coffee break, Mr. Savelkouls took us through what the future might hold for PMI’s stakeholders in our first presentation: “Transformation and Sustainability within Philip Morris International”. An interesting fact he mentioned was that, while the world population is growing, the number of smokers remains constant. This represents a great opportunity for Philip Morris to reevaluate their strategic focus. Mr. Savelkouls also tackled common misconceptions, suggesting that contrary to what people think, the tobacco industry can have an important role in solving the smoking problem. This is one of the main points within PMI’ sustainability strategy – convincing people to switch to less harmful products, such as the newly released IQOS device.

The release of this “reduced risk product” allowed Philip Morris International to publish their first ever Sustainability Report in 2016. One of the striking figures in the report is the fact PMI now allocates approx. 70% of their R&D spending on the development of smoke-free products, even though this segment currently only represents 12% of their net revenues. Their overall emphasis on the development of technology-driven, smoke-free products is a great example of sustainability being at the core of a major company’s strategic pivot.

Numbers aside, most students that attended the visit at the Philip Morris International Headquarters in Lausanne were pleasantly surprised by the overall work environment and culture. The free of charge gym, with provided gym attires, and motorsport-themed “Paddock” smoking area were the two favorite workplace perks among the BSL Master students.

To conclude, we would like to thank the people that made this visit possible and PMI for sharing with us their long-term vision on sustainability – hoping it will allow them to leave their competition in a cloud of smoke.

Author:

Ana Maria Login – MIB Master in International Business, Spring 2017 Intake