Michel Jordi ignites that spark in the students of BSL on the occasion of their Business Innovation Week!

It was a pleasure to share some exciting times and “aha” moments with the students of BSL on the occasion of their Business Innovation Week this February. Thanks to the invitation of BSL’s Acting Dean, Dr. David Claivaz, and the newly appointed Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Doctoral school, Dr. Dominique Bourqui, I had the opportunity to exchange with the students on their entrepreneurial projects, which they pitched on the last day. As a serial entrepreneur, I was impressed by the creativity, the innovation and the scope of the projects the students presented. During our time together, we worked through the Lucky Clover and the Rainbow Target, the two first stages of my risk filter, to help them determine if their projects are fit for the Rollercoaster of Entrepreneurship. I could definitely see some promising ones!

Each group used these tools constructively to establish their business plan and this process encouraged them to develop their entrepreneurial mindset. It was interesting to challenge them, and see what ideas and revelations came out of putting them virtually in the driver’s seat of this exciting journey, as well as have them implement these tools to their specific needs. Some differences arose depending on whether they had a more personal or professional approach or a more individual one versus a team one. This illustrated the tools’ range in application and how they can be used to respond to the unpredictable nature of entrepreneurship. The students were curious, eager to learn and very interactive, which are key characteristics for success. As my mentor, K. Ueno used to say: “Everyone is my teacher, except myself.”

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In my new entrepreneurial book, “Ignite That Spark – 10 Commandments of Entrepreneurship”, I provide an insight into the world of business in which I share my own “real life experiences” and give a complete 360° view of entrepreneurship in a nutshell. Recognizing that time is precious and we think in images, I deliberately adopted a straight-to-the-point approach. My goal was to keep this book short and simple with memorable illustrations, the size of a notebook. It reads like a fine dining menu at a gourmet temple. You can read it à la carte or go for the full discovery menu with all its delicacies and calories.

But “Ignite that Spark” is not just another entrepreneurial book or a song, it is a message, a philosophy of life to break free and live your passion. The “Lucky Clover” is the kick-off highlighting the first 4 commandments. This is the entry test to have a first personal assessment to find out whether or not you are fit for the Rollercoaster of Entrepreneurship. The “Rainbow Target” is a roadmap to fine-tune your Business Plan. The “10 commandments” are recommendations, essential tips and “Red Flags” of do’s and don’ts. This book is a condensed guide packed with take-home value, which should be on every entrepreneur’s desk to refer to at any time.

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Exclusively for this special occasion, we presented for the first time our brand new “Ride to Success” illustration, which will enhance our upcoming e-book, and the new version of our Ignite That Spark song with its empowering lyrics, available on our YouTube channel. The event came to a close with the students and the professors all up and dancing, which we hope was a clear sign of a sparkling collaboration!

Today, my mission is to dedicate my time to pass on my good and bad experiences to the next generations. Entrepreneurship is indeed like riding a rollercoaster. You have to hang on through the lows to enjoy the highs. And my hope is that through the anecdotes and stories of my personal journey, I helped to show to the students that anything is possible and that I inspired them to break free and live their passion!

www.ignitethatspark.com

Book signing 1Author: Michel Jordi

Innovation course addressing the learning appetite of students, the imperatives for companies and the challenges for megatrends

As I am correcting the post-assignments of the “Internal and External innovation” course, I am reflecting on the nature of innovation that will have to be addressed by us but more importantly by our students over the next decade.

Obviously, the Digital revolution will continue and it is estimated that half of the jobs in this area in 2030 don’t exist today.

Sustainability: the increase of population from 7.5B today to 10B in 2050, with natural resources that will actually reduce in absolute value, will have to be tackled.

Inequality, with a middle class that used to be the cement of democracy, will get poorer and with an aging population that may not afford the cost of medical care.

There are a dozen more critical topics that will equally require a constant curiosity, critical eye, pertinent innovation, and successful execution.

Along with all the courses of BSL, we hope that the innovation best practices and experiments that our students have played with will better equip them to face these challenges. We hope that the creative teamwork they have engaged in the internal and external innovation class will give them the fortitude to discover, to ideate, to try, to iterate and deliver value for the world.

In the meanwhile, our students will certainly deliver value to customers, helping their company to develop and prosper, but also ensuring that this prosperity will bring true value that will not be used to buy and deplete other companies.

To achieve this ambitious vision, we sincerely believe that we have given the participants an appetite for continuous learning, confidence in the creativity they showed during their childhood and the trust in working in teams, as they did in our class, working for instance on a real venture. They helped indeed a young entrepreneur in collecting customer insights, making sense of them and brainstorming on various scenarios. True Design Thinking process applied in real life!

Yves KarcherAuthor: Yves Karcher, BSL Associate Professor

BSL Alumni Mentoring Program – a year after the launch

careers guidance counsellorThe BSL Alumni Mentoring Program has been up and running for a full year, with 20 Alumni and 20 students involved in this pilot project launched by BSL Careers in January 2018. It is time to share with our community some observations and feedback about the program.

To mentor? Or not to mentor? This is the question that many BSL Alumni may have asked themselves after reading the email about my mentoring idea in summer 2017. It’s been nearly one and a half years since and I have spoken to numerous people both in person and over calls on the phone and Skype for interviews, the launch and the feedback gathering. As the designer of the program, it has been a great experience for me to get to know the Alumni, and to connect students with mentors from around the world.

I started gathering feedback from the mentors and the mentees throughout 2018. This data was collected through emails and face-to-face interactions and has enabled me to identify encouraging patterns as well as some areas for improvement. The results varied with many connections working well, with few barely taking off at all. Let’s look at some of the key takeaways from the program.

Positive patterns

The majority of students selected for the program reported that they found the experience to be a great success and enjoyed their first taste of a high-level networking. These students stated that the program offered them a safe space, free from grading and judgement, offering them opportunities to understand more about how professionals think in the different phases of their careers. The discussions concerning careers and professional development were also found to be extremely valuable.

Most of the Alumni mentors enjoyed opportunities to connect and engage in thoughtful conversations with younger, ‘switched on’ students and gained valuable insight on the next generation’s trends and incentives.

A discussion with a particular mentor made me realize that the program could also develop in directions that were not necessarily foreseen during the design phase. A very experienced entrepreneur, who was paired with a Master student, shared his highlight of the program, mentioning that “…at some point, the student and I swapped the mentor-mentee role as we reached such a great level of empathy between us. Something I truly enjoyed!”. I found this statement to be highly encouraging, as both the mentor and mentee indicated that they have continued the mentoring beyond the 10 hours and will meet this coming April in person!

Some experienced Alumni have also expressed their appreciation for the program, being of the opinion that it came at the right time in their careers when they felt a need to give back and help others.

On top of these positive patterns, we managed to bring some of our Alumni back to BSL and enrich our MBA seminars while tightening the connection between current students and Alumni, something which is particularly important when nurturing our community.

Where and how can the program improve?

I have taken into account that many of the Alumni who have a wealth of managerial and work experience have never officially mentored anyone before. Taking this feedback into consideration, I will be preparing future mentors with some practical examples to help guide and inspire them. In doing this I hope to improve the overall experience for both mentors and mentees.

Additionally, I received feedback regarding the impact of imposing mentoring time frames. Some felt that by assigning 10 hours to this process, the program ran the risk of limiting an experience that should develop naturally, without boundaries. This feedback will be implemented into future programs when new mentors will only receive a finite amount of hours to decide whether they will continue mentoring their mentees.

Lastly, many mentors expressed concerns that their mentees seemed to be more interested in accessing their networks than engaging in holistic discussions about their future. As the aim of the mentorship program is to create a space in which mentors can share personal and professional decisions, challenges, dreams and fears, we will be adapting the application process, requiring new applicants to submit a thorough motivation statement.

Alumni Mentoring Program in 2019

If you are a BSL Alumna/Alumnus with 5-7 years of management experience and would like to know more about the BSL Alumni Mentoring Program, please contact me directly at daniele.ticli@bsl-lausanne.ch. I will be happy to walk you through the objectives of the program and share some inspiring stories with you!

Dani-Linkedin-300x300Author: Daniele Ticli, BSL Head of Careers and External Affairs

12 Images of an effective learning environment

For quite some time, I have been thinking about the characteristics of an effective learning environment. My objective was to compile a list of ideas in response to the question “What makes a learning environment an effective one?”

Recently, I read the book Mindstorms: Children, Computers, and Powerful Ideas by Seymour Papert. First published in 1980, this book includes Papert’s arguments in favor of using computers as a learning tool in an educational setting. Being an education theorist, Papert characterizes the essential properties of an effective educational system. I was amazed at how close the ideas presented by the author were to my experiences as an educator. Therefore, I thought it was time for me to present the twelve images that characterize an effective learning environment as seen by Papert and experienced by myself.

  1. In an effective learning environment, learning occurs naturally as a byproduct of the learners’ interactions with their surroundings, without the need of structured teaching (e.g. lectures, presentations), similar to the way a child learns to talk or walk. In such environments, learning occurs through embodied experiences that engage a full range of human sensitivities in an interactive and spontaneous way.
  1. In an effective learning environment, the educator focuses on creating personally meaningful and intellectually coherent learning experiences for the learners. In such environments, learning is not separate from reality. The learners are thereby not left alone in making sense of what they learn and are guided by the educators in their journeys of reconciling, accommodating and assimilating new knowledge within their existing intellectual structures.
  1. In an effective learning environment, the learners and educators both challenge themselves by venturing into the unknown and going into a space that is out of the boundaries of their comfort zones. They give themselves permission to fail and learn from their failures. In such environments, exploration, failure, and discovery are key ingredients of the learning process.
  1. In an effective learning environment, the learners make the newly acquired knowledge and ideas their own. They deconstruct what they learn into fundamental ideas, reshuffle and combine them in new and innovative ways and generate a personalized way of applying and communicating what they have learned.
  1. In an effective learning environment, theoretical knowledge is a means to amplify and expand the learners’ intuitive understanding of their surroundings. In such environments, not only does theoretical knowledge not oppose the intuitive insights of the learners, but it also serves as a mechanism through which the learners can enhance and refine their intuition, and subsequently their creative capacity.
  1. In an effective learning environment, interaction, communication and collaboration amongst the learners and between the learners and the educators are facilitated and enriched. In such environments dialogues are viewed as a free flow of meaning and knowledge is viewed as a means of creating harmony between the learners and their surroundings.
  1. In an effective learning environment, measuring learning provides an opportunity for more learning, rather than hampering it. Therefore, the learner’s understanding of a subject matter is not merely judged as “right” or “wrong” but considered, by the educator, as a powerful starting point and a foothold for designing further learning.
  1. In an effective learning environment, the learner and the educator’s roles are interchangeable. In such environments, learners learn from their peers, realizing that the educator’s role is not exclusive to the educator and that they themselves can be sources of inspiration when it comes to knowledge acquisition and development. Educators also realize that to be an educator is synonymous with being a lifelong learner.
  1. In an effective learning environment, the learners learn from the educators not by “what they say” but by “what they do”. In such an environment, the educators are the embodiment of the ideas that they want the learners to encounter, and they look sensitively for conflicts between what they preach and what they practice (i.e., their stated and revealed preferences).
  1. In an effective learning environment, both the learners and educators think about the ways they think and learn about the ways they learn. In such environments, every topic provides the learners and educators with an opportunity to become a better learner and thinker by reflecting upon their assumptions, mental models and cognitive heuristics and biases.
  1. In an effective learning environment, learning is an interdisciplinary undertaking. Meaning that, boundaries between different disciplines fade and that learners and educators are encouraged to transfer insights from one field of inquiry to another. In such environments, the focus is on creating connections between seemingly different ideas.
  1. In an effective learning environment, the fundamental assumptions underlying what constitutes an effective learning environment are continually challenged and critically reflected upon. In such environments, education is viewed as a fluid and ever-changing phenomenon that should dynamically adapt to cultural, pedagogical, scientific and technological developments.

I hope these 12 images can give you a bigger picture of an effective learning environment. While compiling this list, I quickly realized that each of these 12 images deserves a more in-depth treatment. Therefore, my intention is to elaborate on every point and exemplify it with instances and cases from my own learning design activities. So, stay tuned for the next entries in this series. Meanwhile, if you think some more ideas need to be added to this list, please do not hesitate to leave a comment. I would also be happy to know which of these images resonated most with you.

arash golnamAuthor: Dr. Arash Golnam, BSL Professor

Educators’ dilemma: is neoclassical economics consistent with the laws of physics?

As educators, our most important task is to help prepare our students to lead successful professional and personal lives, for the next 40+ years, until 2060 and well beyond. While much is unknown on this time scale, we now do understand the big picture, including fundamental human needs, as well as the material basis for satisfying them, especially around biodiversity and energy – the previous blog “Reflections on 2018: complexity, messiness, progress” provides a few illustrations.

So, while we cannot provide recipes valid for half a century, we certainly can help our students develop a way of thinking, even a worldview, which will prepare them for the challenges they will face.

This means first and foremost understanding human society and the economy in “real”, biophysical terms, including the underlying energy and material flows.

We could start with biophysical economics, a school of economics based on biological and physical resources, with a strong focus on energy, especially around food production, new energy sourcing, and the concept of EROI (energy return on (energy) invested). Biophysical economics has a long history, starting in the 1920s with Frederick Soddy (building on 19th-century insights, especially the laws of thermodynamics), with major contributions by Nicholas Georgescu-Roegen in the 1970s, and more recently by Charles A. S. Hall, Cutler Cleveland, and Robert Costanza. The Encyclopedia of Earth provides an excellent overview.

So far, this work has remained outside of mainstream economics. There are many reasons, including a much higher complexity of looking at underlying material and energy flows instead of money, and the fact that most leading practitioners, including all listed above, are not economists. It requires a fundamentally cross-discipline approach. At the same time, this is a big opportunity for teachers of other disciplines beyond economics to help expand learners’ perspective. I sincerely hope this gives rise to many fundamental reflections.

Biophysical economics is closely related to ecological economics, but differs in its focus on energy and entropy, compared to the latter’s focus on ecosystem services. Both are forms of strong sustainability, as opposed to environmental economics and similar approaches, which complement neoclassical economics with pricing externalities, but regard all forms of capital as interchangeable (for example, human misery or polluted water is OK, as long as sufficient economic value is created). Biophysical economics not at all related to econophysics, which applies methods (originally developed in physics) around stochastic processes and nonlinear dynamics to classical economics – to simplify market economics worldview, physics tools.

Notwithstanding its sophisticated mathematical toolbox, neoclassical economics considers itself (and is) a social science, focusing on markets and human behavior, mainly of consumers and managers. In the classical view, scarcity leads to higher prices, spurring technological innovation and substitution, allowing the economy to continue growing (forever).

Let me illustrate this disconnect with a few examples:

  • Absurd energy-related decisions: producing bioethanol (a biofuel) requires oil, and for every 100 joules (J) of oil, around 80 J of bioethanol are produced – a net energy loss of 20%, in addition to pollution, biodiversity loss, human labor, etc. In real terms, this makes absolutely no sense; with subsidies, in our distorted financial system, it might be profitable.
  • New energy sources: our growth society requires constant discovery of new energy with an EROI (energy return on invested) >11 (Fizaine and Court, 2016, “Energy expenditure, economic growth, and the minimum EROI of society”). Historically, oil had an EROI over 100, current oil sources are around 17 and falling; solar panels typically have an EROI of 4-8. There are currently no known new energy sources, broadly scalable in the coming decades, with the required EROI to maintain our growth economy.

revisiting the limits to growthSource: Hall and Day, 2009, “Revisiting the Limits to Growth After Peak Oil”

  • Decoupling economic growth from energy use is unfortunately not happening. In fact, due to the rebound effect, energy efficiency often leads to an absolute increase in energy demand. For example, our consumption of energy for lighting has increased about 100’000 times over 300 years, or about 10’000 times per capita, in spite of an extraordinary increase in efficiency. The consumption of light itself increased a billion times.

All models are oversimplified and wrong; some are however useful. Unfortunately, the neoclassical economics model has outlived its usefulness. Consequently, many economists, managers, and political leaders make dangerous decisions not understanding the physical limits, or at least the practical limits to substitutability, scaling and deployment. The reason I believe the biophysical economics model will be much more useful is that it starts with the most fundamental constraints of all life: energy and entropy.

To answer the question in the title: with the notable exception of limits to material and energy consumption growth, neoclassical economics mostly stays within the laws of physics (without necessarily paying much attention to them), sadly ignoring the biosphere it depends on. Just as bad, it completely ignores human well-being beyond the idealized, rational, by now discredited “homo oeconomicus”. As such, it is no longer serving the society it is part of.

The way forward: while we know what we need to do, we don’t quite know how to get there in the relatively short time available, in a world of soon-to-be severely constrained energy and degrading-but-still-functioning ecosystem services.

As educators, we’ll succeed if we equip our students to experiment as (social) entrepreneurs and find effective solutions to human and environmental issues. Just as importantly, our students should feel empowered to shape the reality they live in, take proactive steps towards changing the rules of the game, vote and engage in politics, and serve as role models in their communities. Some of their projects could become the seeds of future human prosperity. Helping learners move beyond neoclassical economics will be a necessary first step. A deep awareness of the biophysical reality might be a good place to start. This is our challenge for all teachers and learners, in every discipline.

Sascha_NICK Author: Sascha Nick, BSL Professor

Reflecting on 2018: complexity, messiness, progress

December is an excellent time to reflect on the year, and 2018 requires more reflection than most. Wherever one looks, 2018 was messy, from politics (consider, for very different reasons, Brexit endgame, “gilets jaunes”, or Korean denuclearization) to how we deal with major issues: picture 30’000 COP24 delegates in Katowice, surrounded by coal mines and coal dust, struggling to put in practice the good intentions of the 2015 Paris Agreement.

2018 was a year of extraordinary progress of knowledgeTo illustrate:

In February, Steven Pinker set the tone with his well-researched book “Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress”, demonstrating the spectacular improvement of human wellbeing on 15 dimensions, including health, safety, and happiness, using data to dispel common myths.

This was followed by one of the most important scientific publications ever, the IPCC 1.5°C report. For the first time, we know exactly what to do to limit warming to avoid the worst consequences (simplified: reduce CO2 emissions by 58% by 2030, replant forests).

 

Report October 2018

Source: IPCC 1.5°C Report, October 2018

Scientists from the University of Leeds scaled these limits to a per capita level in their paper “A good life for all within planetary boundaries” (Phosphorus 890 g, Nitrogen 8.9 kg, material footprint 7.2 t). They introduced a new indicator eHANPP (embodied human appropriation of net primary production), representing biomass harvested or killed for human use, with a suggested limit of 2.62 t per person per year.

Why don’t we act as needed? Knowing exactly what to do is only a first step, but it’s not very useful if we don’t act. So, we need to ask, why are most of what we do “business as usual”? Why do we keep collectively creating outcomes most of us don’t want, like environmental destruction, broken communities, lack of trust, financial crises, millions of refugees, malnutrition, or obesity? This includes individual, company and government action, often pulling in the same (wrong) direction.

Part of the answer lies in the way our socio-economic system has evolved, with its stocks, flows, buffers, positive and negative feedback loops, rules, parameters etc. A simplified example: debt payments require growth, which requires cheap energy, meaning burning fossil fuels, leading to pollution and many other problems.

A bigger part, however, is probably linked to the way we think about the economy: as an independent system, following its own mechanistic rules (remember supply and demand curves from Econ101), separate from the environment and partly detached from society. At its core is money, as a benchmark, behavior driver, store of value, in addition to being a means of exchange.

Without this cultural baggage, an independent observer would see a still beautiful planet with a threatened biosphere; closed material flows but open energy flows powered by the sun; a dominant, individually smart but collectively stupid species obsessed with power and money; a highly complex human society and civilization as a subset of the biosphere; an economy as a subset of society and sub-subset of the biosphere, completely dependent on ecosystem services it is busy undermining.

Outlook: Looking back as far as our data will allow, with Steven Pinker’s help, suggests hope. The progress of knowledge in 2018 reinforces this hope, in spite of the rising complexity of today’s issues. The next blog will examine how we as educators can contribute.

Sascha_NICKAuthor: Sascha Nick, BSL Professor

An exotic Internship between BSL & Sumba Hospitality Foundation

In 2017, Business School Lausanne (BSL) and Sumba Hospitality Foundation (SHF) in Indonesia co-created an Internship program tailor-made for BSL students called Sustainable Development Internship.

You may wonder, what is Sumba? And what do they do? So, let us share a brief presentation of this Foundation. SHF offers a vocational training in hospitality for Sumbanese underprivileged youth. The holistic education program provides students with general courses and enables them to graduate in Culinary, Food & Beverage Service, Housekeeping or Front office. To allow the students to apply and train their skills, SHF has opened ten luxury guest pavilions, a SPA as well as a restaurant & bar to the public. Education, environmental awareness and sustainability are the three most important principles of the foundation. It is in the belief of the foundation that tourism can be a positive force in poverty-stricken regions particularly when its community is involved in the process. The goal of the foundation is to assist in providing viable employment to Sumba’s young inhabitants and break the cycle of poverty while also protecting the environment and their culture.

A large part of the campus is dedicated to the growth and maintenance of a sustainable, organic farm, created with the precepts of the burgeoning field of permaculture in mind. Produce from the land are used in the restaurant and the students are taught current farming methods with guidelines to better cultivate their land. SHF aims to raise the students’ awareness of their environment. The school is powered entirely by solar energy allowing SHF to be completely off the grid and re-uses wastewater for irrigation.

One of our BSL students on Sumba Island, Morgan Manin, is doing his internship as part of his Capstone Project (Master of International Business); I took the opportunity to ask him via email for a preliminary description of his internship, to share with our community.

BSL internship

“Reading about SHF on the website and social media made me choose it to do my internship, as my values match perfectly with the foundation’s values and I believe that I will be learning a lot during my Sustainable Development Internship. After the first week, I have identified areas where I could be helpful and learn, which I can summarize with three main tasks and responsibilities. The first one is to analyze the financials at SHF and therefore create a budget for each department meaning the actual school, the administration, the hotel, sustainability and the F&B, including an indication of Capex by departments. I will also guide the SHF finance team towards greater transparency and define cost improvement initiatives.

The second main responsibility I have is to create a Triple Bottom Line Reporting (TBL). TBL is a progressive mode of reporting and seems suited to the SHF. Sustainability centric practices are deeply entrenched in the DNA of the SHF business model. Environmental and social responsibility sit at the core of daily practices and this alongside the true cost of these operationalized initiatives must be reported. I will then gather information to facilitate understanding around the social, environmental and economic practices of SHF. I will conduct research into TBL, using these understandings and research knowledge, with the aim to create a presentation that highlights sound reasoning and justifies or rejects TBL as a means of reporting at SHF. If TBL is found to be preferred mode of reporting, the presentation will include a step-by-step guide detailing a prescribed pathway toward the implementation of TBL reporting at SHF, and then create the strategy that details how to implement TBL as the reporting mechanism for SHF. In the event that SHF management decides to implement TBL as their primary mode of reporting, I will then begin the process of implementation.

To finish, I will be the IT ‘go-to’ person for the team, helping everyone out on Excel, Word, etc.

I will also consider improved ways of using IT for communication for the SHF team.

Before I arrived here, it was planned that I would have to formulate a business plan to be shared with others wanting to duplicate the model of the SHF. I will, therefore, formulate a business plan, constructed in such a way that it has the capacity to facilitate like-minded operators wanting to duplicate the SHF model.

In addition to my primary tasks and responsibilities, I will have ad-hoc tasks set by the Executive Director, I will take care of the students during their study hours and exams as well as shepherding them at night and being in charge of sport activities for the students; also, I will monitor Community English classes for young Sumbanese children living in the neighborhood.

I strongly believe that I will learn so much through this experience, being in a different environment, living in this community, having multiple tasks matching with what I have learned at BSL, and matching the BSL values”.

Morgan, we are all proud of you, we wish you a great experience and let’s see if we can come visit you at some point on that amazing island!

Dani-Linkedin-300x300Author: Daniele Ticli, BSL Head of Careers and External Affairs