Keeping the student spirit up!

We meet with BSL professor Erdal Atukeren, who’s telling us about his journey into continuing education.

Can you tell us a little bit about yourself, what is your background?

I am Turkish by birth and Swiss by marriage. I studied Economics & Business Administration (B.A.), and Econometrics (M.A.) in Turkey. Then, I went to Canada and completed a Master’s degree and a Ph.D. in Economics at the University of Ottawa. I came to Switzerland in 1995 and worked at the UBS in emerging markets research and credit risk management areas. Afterwards, I joined the ETH in Zurich and worked there for more than 13 years in economic research, mostly focusing on macroeconomic modeling and forecasting and doing third-party projects. Currently, I teach at BSL and other business schools. I am research-oriented and I have published a good number of articles in academic journals. I serve as an Editorial Board member in International Journal of Sustainable Economy, Journal of International Trade and Economic Development, and Investment Management and Financial Innovations. I am also serving as Guest Editor at the Journal of Risk and Financial Management (Special Issue on Macroeconomic Forecasting) and at the Resources journal (Special Issue on Global Economic Development, Resources and Environment).

What do you teach at BSL, and how long have you been part of our faculty?

I started teaching at BSL in Fall 2010 with the MIB Economics for Business course. Afterwards, I taught BBA courses and later on Master’s courses as well. I currently teach Business Mathematics & Calculus, Business Statistics, and Sustainable Business Strategy at the BBA level. At the Master’s level, I teach the Economics for Business, Risk Management, and the Sustainable Economy courses. In the past, I taught the BBA Operations Management and the MSIF Quantitative Methods I courses as well.

What do you enjoy most about teaching?

I like to see when students start a course with little or no knowledge in some subjects and how it changes overtime. Sometimes, the students think they know a topic; but upon systematic thinking about the concepts, questioning how they are operationalized, and scrutinizing the assumptions they are based on, they see that it is not an easy task. If they are confused about what they think they knew before, I am happy. This is also important for being innovative and developing the thinking-outside-the-box skills. The class environment at BSL is very multicultural. I like to see how students from different cultures and backgrounds tackle an issue and also work together to generate diverse ideas.

How did you get to start up studies again? And what did it bring you?

I live in Zurich. I come to the BSL by train for my classes. Depending on the term, I travel a lot between Zurich and Renens. I read a lot on my trips but I was thinking about using my time more productively and do my readings on a more systematic basis. Four years ago, with these thoughts in mind, I enrolled in a distance education program in Sociology offered by Anadolu University in Turkey. Anadolu University has a Western European Office in Köln – Germany, which coordinates their distance education programs offered in Europe. I’ve now graduated with a B.A in Sociology. Sociology provides a broader perspective into the issues we are facing today. It gives a more holistic perspective – going beyond the narrow lenses of other disciplines.

What is the one piece of advice you would give to a graduating student?

Congratulations! Keep learning, keep the student spirit up. We are always students.

 

 

From Knowing to Doing – Developing Feedback Fluency of Future Leaders

In this semester’s Leadership and Management skills course I was looking for ways that would enable students to dig in deeper and stretch their learning. Each four hour session is designed to be experiential and learning is facilitated by using a combination of virtual simulations, reflection, applying the flipped classroom method, role play, assessments, working out loud and practicing participatory leadership tools.

A key skill set that I have noticed is often lacking in the management domain is the ability to give feedback in a timely and constructive manner.

Working with a class of 24 students from 12 countries you can imagine the differences in perspectives related to this skill. For example:

  • From my point of view, a feedback is connected with negative emotions and taking criticism personally, not on the work that one does.
  • I grew up in a culture where giving feedback is not the norm. Or if someone is giving you “Feedback”, it it’s usually to make you feel bad or prove they’re better than you are.
  • In my experience giving and receiving feedback were not positive experiences for me, for this reason I was scared to be involved in this process.
  • Sometimes when we give feedback towards our team members it may affect them from a personal perspective, it’s a very sensitive topic.

To create something that would truly create powerful impact with the students, I reached out to Sarah Schwab the CEO of The Experience Accelerator to ask if we could create a project together that would help the students build their feedback skills into a competence.  Sarah was open to the idea and we created a five-part learning journey for the students.

  1. It began with students logging into The Experience Accelerator to visualize a feedback virtual scenario
  2. Students were debriefed on the scenario and required to practice giving feedback and recording their interaction.
  3. Before class students received written feedback on their practice focusing on the areas they had performed well in as well as suggestions on how they could improve.
  4. At this point the learning went live and students had the opportunity in class to practice by giving, receiving and observing feedback in different scenarios that had been prepared for them. Watch the video
  5. And finally, students were given the opportunity to write a reflection about what they learned over the course of the assignment

In their reflection papers students expressed their surprise at the power of the exercise:

“I have learned that feedback is not about telling what the person did right or wrong, but about explaining how he or she made the other person feel.” KB

“I realized again how challenging it is when performing the online scenario where it somehow appeared easy when watching the video, but was a totally different story when I had to do my own recordings.” ME

“I would like to say that such an experience was truly helpful for me. I gained a lot of knowledge in terms of feedback, particularly if I want to give an effective feedback, I should always practice and be aware of some key points in order to avoid making mistakes from the very beginning.” SK

Their ability to put into practice a four step feedback model*  both virtually and in class during live role play has categorically changed the beliefs’ students had about feedback. Furthermore they now have a toolkit and clear understanding of how to deliver effective constructive feedback.

*Clarify the context, explain using as much detail as possible what happened, explain the impact their action had on the situation and discuss possible steps on how to move forward.

Author:

Nadene Canning, BSL Professor

 

The wonderful world of online education

I am a big fan of online learning and have done many Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC’s) on Coursera (www.coursera.org).

Last year I participated in an online course in « Negotiation & Influence » at Yale University (http://sg.emeritus.org/management-certificate-programs/negotiation-and-influence/) thanks to the faculty development fund of BSL. It was my objective to update myself on these topics, because I teach a class on Business Ethics and Negotiation at BSL.

In addition to learning new fun stuff, this course helped me to put myself in the shoes of my students. I realized that I couldn’t always answer all questions in the weekly quizzes even though I had listened attentively to all the video lectures. This reminded me not to be disappointed when the same thing happens to my students. You just cannot expect students to remember or understand everything that you said just once in class. Of course, everything is crystal clear to you as a teacher, also because you are deep into your topic and have given the class before. Forgetting this is a common “déformation professionelle” of teachers. You always must try harder, repeat, document, and check if students have understood, let them repeat what the task was, be patient and never take it personally.

Besides this more general lesson in self-awareness, this course was extremely useful to get new ideas for my own course.

On the other hand, I was a bit skeptical: Can you really teach a highly interactive skill like negotiating online? Of course, in negotiation you must learn basic concepts like how to prepare for a negotiation, how to haggle, or how to close a deal, but in the end, you always learn the most if you actually negotiate. I was curious to find out how you could run role play negotiations in the virtual space.

It turned out that negotiating online is no problem at all. My fellow students and I met on a special online platform, or we negotiated via WhatsApp or Skype. Every week during this two-month course, we were assigned to classmates that were in our time zone. Of course, it was different from face to face negotiation, but I found it almost as good. Furthermore, in today’s world many negotiations do take place on the phone, on Skype or via email.

What I really liked about the course was its broad focus. As the title “Negotiation & Influence” implies, it went far beyond simply trying to get the biggest piece of the pie. Indeed, negotiation is so much more! It is basically a decision-making process that you need every time you cannot achieve your goals alone (this nice definition comes from the godmother of negotiation, Leigh Thompson, and is the foundation of the course I teach). In today’s business world, it is virtually impossible to achieve our goals alone. This is why negotiation is so important.

If we look at negotiation like this, it is also clear that things like relationships and trust are key. According to research, the “subjective value” of a negotiation (i.e. did I have a good relationship with my partner, did I feel treated with fairness, did I feel good during the negotiation) is even more important than the objective mostly monetary value I achieve in a negotiation.  Even if the objective value one gains from a negotiation is positive, this “victory” is not sustainable if you felt uncomfortable with your negotiation partner, or felt rushed or treated with disrespect.

However, if the partners both enjoyed the interaction, they have a great foundation for the future. One study even shows that job applicants that experienced positive subjective value during their salary negotiations were more likely to like their job and stay in their job one year after the job negotiations (http://web.mit.edu/curhan/www/docs/Publications/Curhan_Getting_Off_on_the_Right_Foot.pdf).

You did not only learn theoretically about this concept of subjective value in negotiations, but even found out how your negotiation partners experienced you with respect to the subjective value you brought to the table. After every round of negotiation, we filled out a questionnaire (http://www.subjectivevalue.com/) about how we felt about ourselves and our partners during the negotiation, and so did our partners. That way, we received a highly individualized feedback on how we were perceived as negotiation partners in comparison to how we experienced it ourselves.

Another highlight of this course was learning how to deal with difficult negotiation tactics like stonewalling, threats or insults. Here the key is not to succumb to the impulsive reaction of either surrendering to these tactics, mimic them or quit the negotiation. Firstly, you need to avoid emotional reactions and try to look at the situation with detachment. This strategy is called “going to the balcony”. It takes some practice, but once you created this kind of emotional distance it is much easier to either simply ignore the mean tactics or deflect them by either asking smart questions (Please explain to me why the price is suddenly so important?) or naming the game (We came here to negotiate with respect. You do not need to insult me. Can we please continue differently now?). We had to apply evil tactics in one of our role plays and this was especially eye-opening as we changed roles: First my partner tested all kinds of difficult tactics with me and I had to try to stay calm, detached and reasonable. Then we switched roles. I must admit that continuing to be evil was pretty hard, because my partner did a great job in staying calm and reasonable!

In conclusion, online courses are a great way to update yourself on the state of the art of your field, you get new ideas for your own teaching and you stay in touch with the students’ experience. I am already looking for my next MOOC.

 

Prof.-Bettina-PalazzoAuthor: Dr. Bettina Palazzo
Professor at BSL

The Goal – Our climb up Kilimanjaro

To climb a mountain one does not simply start walking up its side. As with any other challenges in life, preparation is key. Mountains do not move, they do not give way nor offer a helping hand. For some, mountains have no interest other than the visual beauty they provide. For others however, mountains are a holy grail, a driving force that imbues these individuals with a sense of adventure. Mountains entice us to reach out of our comfort zones, they inspire us to escape the human world and embrace an entirely alien environment that is their abode. Disconnected from the human world we, as individuals, are able to root ourselves in our own consciousness and expand our understanding of personal actions and thoughts. Through this understanding we are able to connect to the world in a much more primal fashion.

This connection shapes the lifestyle that you aspire to for the rest of your life. This lifestyle revolves around a simple, yet effective plan: one summit at a time. Each summit is a stepping stone to the next, a gateway that has opened in your awareness. Where does this all lead, you might ask? Well, of course there is the goal. The goal is up to you to define, but that goal will impel you higher and higher and higher until you reach places in yourself and the outside world that you never thought possible.

You see, a summit is much more than just the top of a mountain. It is the sum of all of the steps taken to reach that point. By steps, I do not mean one foot in front of the other, but the planning, training and mental preparation that has been invested to get you as far as you have come. This combination of factors brings much more than just the joy of reaching the mountain top. These factors, when combined properly, help you to understand more about your body and aspects of yourself: the ones you excel in, and the ones in which you fall short. Climbing a mountain is physically and mentally strenuous, and while both aspects are imperative to reach the goal, physical training will entirely alter your experience.

We physically trained by climbing every mountain we possibly could within our difficulty level in the months leading up to Kilimanjaro, and were able to notice a tangible difference. Each training made the climb easier and easier, each training informed us on the limits of our body, what we could push and what had to be aware of. This physical training compiled itself in mental exercise. By dedicating ourselves to the goal, in this case Kili, we pushed further and harder than we ever had, always expecting excellence from ourselves.

I would like to digress for a moment to mention a fact that is often ignored: climbing is a very expensive sport. Therefore, in order to excel in climbing one must either attain enough affluence to be financially secure without having to work or be sponsored by organisations. While entirely different methods, these two paths have the same starting point: a dedication to mountains and a drive for the ultimate goal. For some of us, the cost of the next climb may even be the benchmark of what our income should be!

To contemplate a goal, one must first complete the prerequisites: firstly, the ability to fund the trip adequately. There is no cheap way in the mountains, there’s the safe way or no way. Once funding is secured, one must be physically fit. This does not mean going to the gym once a week to lift weights with friends; this is about training for your goal by practicing what you will be doing over and over until it is second nature to your muscles. Assuming you are physically in shape, you must ensure you hold the appropriate knowledge for your climb. Successful mountaineers do not pick a mountain at random, they do their research and know their routes. They expect the best, but prepare for the worst. Being prepared means knowing exactly what you’re going to do and where you’re going to go. But most of all, being prepared means knowing what is safe and what isn’t. Safety is paramount, and the hardest part of climbing a mountain is knowing when to give up. You may find yourself with the end literally in sight, yet, because it is unsafe, will need to turn around and go back where you came from. It can be very hard and the disappointment is immense. Along with safety come limits and boundaries. Boundaries can be pushed in a positive manner to help personal growth; limits on the other hand must be respected. Pushing yourself past your limits takes you from a place of safe development to a place of extreme hazard. You must always respect your limits and listen to your body.

Training isn’t just an excuse to explore the mountains: every time you climb, it is a progressive step towards your end goal. This preparation allows you to visualize yourself completing this goal. The more preparation you have, the more you’re able to visualise, and the more likely you are to complete your goal. But even with all the visualisation in the world, climbing a mountain takes longer than a boxing match; there is no “ding ding” done. To achieve your goal, whether it is a mountain summit, a business venture or personal development, “vumilia” is required. Vumilia, patience, is the driving factor hiding in the shadows: the undeveloped muscle that must be worked every day.

To conclude, I would like to leave you with a quote by the late Roger Payne, a truly brilliant mountaineer and wonderful human being, who took both Arshia and myself up our first summit together. Right before we set out, he told us: “the right pace is the one where you feel you will never achieve your goal. Only at this pace will you not only reach the goal of today, but also the goal of tomorrow.”

Pole Pole Vumilia Sana
“Slowly, slowly, with patience…”

Authors:

Arshia Soltan, BBA Student

Eric Illick, BBA Student

 

Alumni Mentoring Program – What is it all about?

Within the context of employability, I often hear people talking about their mentors and how such figures brought more clarity into their lives, on top of leading them to positive and sustainable decisions for their careers. But… what is it that a mentor really does? Does s/he coach? Does s/he train? Why is this role so important and how can we measure the impact a mentor has on a graduating student? I have been asking myself these (and more) questions while setting up the first Alumni Mentoring Program for Business School Lausanne. The answers? I will leave that up to the participants of the program who will be giving us their feedback once the hours of interactions will be completed.

At this point, you may ask yourself how the mentoring actually works.

Simply, fifteen students in their last stage of studies (across BBAs, Masters and MBAs) have been assigned ten hours of mentoring time – virtually and when possible, face to face – with fifteen experienced Alumni. Connections were established considering different elements: years of experience, industry, programs, general fit. In terms of the actual content of their interactions, mentors and mentees will be discussing career plans, professional development and hopefully other employability-related topics, over a period of three to five months. The agenda will be open and students will be able to add points they wish to discuss on the fly.

The aim of this initiative is to help students transitioning to the next phase of their lives, providing them with a safe space where to learn how to interact and network with seasoned professionals, and make the most of their one-to-one conversations.

Nevertheless, students will not be the only ones benefitting from this initiative: mentoring gives clarity also to those who mentor, in this specific case our Alumni. As per their own unanimous admission, their objectives are to learn and take their personal development to a higher level, while giving back to BSL in a constructive way, and to learn more about the employees of the future.

I asked all 30 BSL Community participants to enjoy their time together and to make it as constructive as possible for all parties. The idea is to touch base at the end of the program to collect success stories and learnings, in order to continuously improve the program in an organic and sustainable way. Stay tuned, I will be back with feedback in a few months!

Author: Daniele TicliCreating opportunities for Companies, Students and Alumni by addressing the needs of Education and Corporate world.

 

Looking for more meaning and impact in your life and career? Here’s how to start…

Recently a professional was feeling very frustrated by the fact that they were good at starting new projects but was frustrated because they inevitably ran out of steam before finishing them. This realization was causing self confidence doubt.

Another individual was very unsure about how to transition into a new career and was stagnating, unable to make a decision about their future.

Another young executive had recently realized that the shiny corporate job with all its “advantages” did not correspond to their values and was searching for ways to bring more meaning into his endeavours.

Today many young and seasoned professionals are asking tough questions and looking for answers that will allow them to expand their potential. Very often when people get caught up in their lengthy daily fast paced routines they lose sight of what they started out wanting to achieve. It’s difficult to listen, let alone hear what our heart is longing for when the mind is keeping us too busy.

The good news is, you can. Here are a few ideas to get you started:

#1 Feel Your Feelings…

Get angry or frustrated or confused or scared or excited…. It’s natural and healthy. No need for the stiff upper lip. Accept and love every emotion to create space. Respect your feelings, and then move forward. They provide insights around what you are resisting or longing for.

#2 The Value of Values

Discovering what we value can be elusive especially under the influences of the “shoulds” from society and loved ones. It can help to ask yourself, what is most important to me? Security? Creativity? Freedom? Independence? Money?

#3 Say “Yes” to Everything

Saying “yes” to all opportunities is a powerful expression of self-confidence. It attracts more (and better) opportunities and choices—you can always change your mind. Don’t wait for the “perfect” opportunity to appear, moving forward creates momentum and attracts other new opportunities. The things you say yes to should feel good, and even better, a little scary and exciting. This is a great sign that you are stretching your comfort zone and growing towards your full potential.

#4 The Secret to Reinvention

Don’t know what to “change into?” That’s okay. The only way to find out is to experiment. Volunteer, job shadow, temp or take part-time work in a field you’ve always been curious about as a career. The best place to start is to follow whatever you’re drawn to—trust your instincts.

#5 The “Crafting Life and career for more purpose and impact” Program

For over a decade we’ve been helping people tap back into their true North. We have now created a 2-day course to allow you to step back in a safe environment and have the conversations that you may not dared to have until now. Conversations that may be circling inside your head but you’ve not been listening hard enough to.

A unique experiential learning journey created for you combining assessment tools, reflection, peer to peer collaboration and discovery is planned.

Give yourself this time, to discover where you truly want to have impact and craft the life and career you believe will enable you to fully express your potential. Let yourself be surprised and come away feeling inspired and excited about creating your future.

Take a look at the program taking place on 26 March and give us a shout if you have any questions, we’d love to hear from you. If you are curious to find out more and would like to meet the lead professors, follow our Facebook Live broadcast on 19 February at 12h30 CET. Can’t make it live? Visit our Facebook page to view the recording at your leisure.

Authors:

Natalie Wilkins, BSL Professor

Nadene Canning, BSL Professor