What do Sustainability, Inclusion and Organisational Transformation have to do with Leadership?

Hint:

BSL professors have taken a long hard look at leadership and sustainability and have a strong vision of what is needed to make transformative organizational change a real buzz and not just a string of jargon. We know it won’t be easy, it involves mindset, culture and habits. We know that even when all these important elements are taken into consideration the hurdle of willingness and the resilience to push through the discomfort of uncertainty in order to sustain the change, remains.

There are courageous leaders working throughout industry to make this happen and BSL is looking to bring a selection of these people together to dialogue, share insights and learn how we each are contributing to make this happen. May 10th 2016, we’ve invited 30 companies to bring their know-how to the table. BSL brings its own secret sauces; our grass roots expertise, millennials’ insights and a fervent desire to convene a conversation that honors those who are willing to create change.

If you are running a team, a department or company and would like to receive information on the outcomes or reserve a place at the table on a second courageous leadership conversations in June contact: Mary.Mayenfisch@bsl-lausanne.ch.

Author: Nadene Canning, BSL Professor

Nadene Canning

Swiss Democracy: Strengths, Weaknesses and Threats

General outlines

In many countries people vote to elect the President or Members of the Parliament. Swiss people don’t vote for the President, but elect the MPs, the federal government members including the President being elected by the Parliament.

Unlike in most of other countries, Swiss citizens are requested in addition to vote quite frequently on a wide range of topics at different levels (federal, cantonal or even communal). That is called direct democracy. These votes are the consequences of either an initiative (proposal to amend the federal constitution) or a referendum (opposition to a new law voted by the Parliament). The number of valid signatures required for an initiative to be submitted to the vote is 100’000. This number is currently debated because many citizens consider it too low in comparison with the total population of the country (just above 8’000’000 inhabitants). Another point currently debated is the fact that initiatives are written in quite general terms and that the application laws have not to be designed at that stage. Continue reading