Innovation at BSL: MEDICLY – A transparent blockchain healthcare system

Edited by Dr. Aileen Ionescu-Somers, Gap Frame Week designer and orchestrator

Student Group 1: Mariam Rawashdeh, Alexandra Gritsenko, Abdulkader AL Muhaidib, Andre Linney, Edoardo Danisi, Conrad Zawadzki, Mathieu Feltzinger, Grigory Klyuev, Tarek Talaat

DAY 1 – Ideation

Here we go, dear Readers; we are starting our Spring 2018 Gap Frame Week journey and this is our blog. Our group experience began with everyone introducing himself or herself and sharing personal insights. Out of the 8 members of our group, we had 7 different nationalities. This diversity helped us to get many initial ideas (80, to be precise) and different points of view.

We then discussed personal stories from our countries in connection to the health topic that we had unanimously chosen. What emerged is that health is certainly a multifaceted issue with many issues that need to be addressed. For example, we found during our research that even in developed countries, abuse and misinformation linked to use of medication is prevalent. What do guys think ? Is this a real issue?

While we talked, project ideas started to take shape, such as creating a transparent block chain healthcare system in which hospitals and pharmacies worldwide would be able to access the health background of virtually any patient. We discussed the pros and cons of a concept we called MEDICLY whereby any medical center or pharmacy across the globe could have access to an individual’s health record. The idea seemed appealing but we debated about the challenges of applying such an idea worldwide. For example, we established that there would be knowledge and communication barriers. Since we realized that applying this idea worldwide would be an immense challenge, we decide to stay at a country level, and to focus on Poland.

DAY 2 – Flexing of ideas

Let’s start the second day ! Our first task of the day was to identify relevant stakeholders. We then had to decide on some strategies to explore the feasibility of our Day 1 ideas.

The stakeholders we researched were Customers of companies, Cities & communities. Financial institutions, Consumers, Government and Regulators.

Customers of companies

We interviewed a pharmacist who was delighted with the idea and told us he would agree to take part in such a the project if it were launched. He found it simple, obvious and beneficial not only for the pharmaceutical business but for the entire health-care system.

Cities & communities

For cities & communities we sent an email to a local commune asking them about their opinions regarding the project, whether they would implement it in their commune and whether it is beneficial to them ? We also asked how it could work with local and Swiss regulations (knowing that in Switzerland, each commune is different).

Financial institutions

For financial institutions we interviewed an investor. The interviewed person said that he is observing a tremendous shift in technology and a tendency towards dealing with finance in very different ways (such as cryptocurrency). Medical health-care is an important aspect of human social existence and well-being. In his view, inefficiencies in the healthcare system inevitably translate into big problems for society. The investor we interviewed said that he believes in our idea and could see a future scenario where it may be possible to introduce it.

Consumer

For a consumer perspective, we interviewed fellow students of BSL and staff. The questions we asked were:

  • Do you think the current system of medical prescriptions is fair and functional?
  • Have you ever had any issues in trying to retrieve your or others medical records?
  • Do you know your blood type? If yes, do you have the blood type card with u at all times?
  • Do you know you if you have any allergies?
  • Do you think medical prescriptions are currently too easy or hard to get?

We concluded from the interviews that we had identified a problematic issue. People thought the idea was good but that there would probably be issues to solve regarding the handling of personal information and cloud safety (cybersecurity).

Government and Regulators

For governments & regulators, our team member contacted the Polish Health Ministry. We are still waiting for an answer….oh well…..you can’t win them all!

DAY 3 – Prototyping our concept

Today, we presented our project to all the students and faculty in the main auditorium. We got questions on how could we safely store patient data, and we had an interesting discussion around the block chain idea. Later in the day, we moved on to prototyping our idea. First, we carried out more research to get data that are more concrete and we decided to focus on the U.S. rather than Poland. Second, we shared all the information that different members of the team had been working on, combining and structuring our resources.

Back in our innovation space after our lunch break, we started working on the 10-prototyping criteria provided. We also made some decisions about what our slogan should be. Options we considered were: “partner in life”, “accessibility”, “partner for health”, “private health directory”, and we settled on the latter.

Once we finished the answers we went over the work done and refreshed everything for the opportunity we would have the next day to share our ideas with others and build on them (we call this session the “Frenzy”).

DAY 4 – Refining our prototype

Dear Readers: Here is the last part of our Spring 2018 Gap Frame Week blog!!! On this – the 4th day – we started organizing and planning for the Frenzy. We created posters and finalized the presentation, We even spoke with one of the other groups working on a health challenge also. We discovered that we had synergies and that seeking a partnership with the other student team might even make sense.

During the Frenzy we gave each other feedback. Our fellow students were highly engaged and gave many positive comments.

However, other students really wanted to understand how to ensure a sustainable flow of funding for the project once the program is sold to, for example, the government. We definitely need to focus on the funding model at our next Gap Frame Week in the Summer of 2018.

Once we integrated the feedback, we finished the presentation by adding our draft financial plan.

Phew…..we were finally done! Our team presenter rehearsed in front of everyone as, on the Friday – final day – we would only be allowed an 8 minute presentation. Wish us luck!!

 

One thought on “Innovation at BSL: MEDICLY – A transparent blockchain healthcare system

  1. Blockchain is a great idea, but that technology implementation has issues. Blockchain is based an algorithm that employs ‘modulo 2’ mathematics to arrive at a hash value. Supposedly, only one unique set of data can create that hash value thereby providing assurance and reliability that the data has not been altered. But if just one bit is changed, a different hash value would be generated. Thus, reliability in the system is provided. Most nations promulgate the for their nation a desired hash function as a standard. In the U.S. this was hash function generator was SHA 1 and MD 5. Then, two scientists in China published a paper showing how the hash function algorithms could be diddled with. That is, different data when passed through the algorithm could be made to yield the same hash value – no validity/no reliability. So the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technologies (NIST) promulgated SHA 2. But how much stronger is SHA 2 than SHA 1? Moreover, we see the Chinese government rapidly deploying quantum computing technologies – China already has a satellite using quantum computing technology for secure communications. The power of quantum computing is so great, it may not be long before such new quantum systems may be able to crack almost any algorithm. Hence we all need to think deeply before jumping on the blockchain technology bandwagon with information of value. John Nugent

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