Innovation at BSL: Beep Saved – Technology empowering ordinary people to save lives

Edited by Dr. Aileen Ionescu-Somers

Blog post by GFW3 Spring 2018 Group 6 students: Alexandra Sommer, Alexandre Watry, Anastasia Morozava, Aswin Babu, Diego Dimartino, Kamran Hatam-Zada, Konstantin Goldenberg, Theodore Martorell, Volodymyr Kovalchuk

“One right beep – one saved life”

We are proud to invite you to read our blogpost written during the Spring Gap Frame Week 2018, when BSL students focused on coming up with solutions to some of the world’s most challenging social issues.

Many people with chronic illnesses die each year having collapsed in the street or on the way to hospital due to the lack of first aid knowledge amongst people passing by. Our research revealed that 150,000 lives could be saved in Europe yearly if passersby were able to provide effective immediate first aid. We were interested to learn that St John Ambulance research shows that 59% of interviewed people would not feel comfortable providing first aid on the street due to their own lack of knowledge (The Guardian, 2010).

In Russia, many people suffer from diseases such as epilepsy, diabetes and chronic heart disease. The overall number of Russian people with these diseases is actually 32.5 million. Therefore, there is a high risk of people collapsing on the street on a daily basis, and not receiving critical and appropriate first aid from passers-by. After our preliminary research, our Group decided to focus on providing an effective solution to this issue in Russia, a country where victims of heart attacks or other problems have a high risk of not receiving primary first aid on the street. Frequent long delays in ambulance arrivals exacerbate the problem and makes it even more important for passersby to have high awareness and good knowledge about how to act in case of emergency.

Our team came up with an idea of a wearable technology – Beep Saved – that would allow people with health conditions to be attended easily and safely in case of an emergency. Our wearable technology – worn on the wrist much like a watch – provides a panic SOS button, which identifies the emergency, immediately calls for an ambulance using GPS technology, makes a recognizable sound/alarm to attract the attention of people nearby, and provides the passerby with tailor-made first aid tips depending on the person’s health condition. The screen carefully guides the bystander through minimal step-by-step instructions to ensure that the person has as optimal a chance as possible of surviving the episode (CPR, positioning of the body, etc). Click here for a demo to show the operating principle.

To test whether we had a feasible concept, we decided to explore the perceptions of three different groups: customers, doctors, and investors. That meant that we needed to get out into the external environment and meet stakeholders so we carried out interviews in three different locations: the city center of Lausanne, the university hospital (CHUV) and at Business School Lausanne.

We prepared three different questionnaires based on qualitative and quantitative data. Afterwards we divided our group evenly, to carry out the interviews. After carefully reviewing the results, we noted that all stakeholders provided common feedback: acceptance and interest in the concept.

We enhanced our prototype ideas as a result of our research (an interactive screen, GPS for ambulance, SOS button, heart rate checker, and speaker to let passersby know that the person is in need of help). We also added the monitor idea, to show first aid tips to perform in advance of the arrival of an ambulance.

After pitching our idea to the other student groups and faculty, and receiving feedback, we came up with the final technology software prototype. Our group decided to locate this business in Russia and to produce the technology in Latvia due to the costs and legal aspects. We decided not to produce in China as wanted to create a sustainable responsible business and did not feel that outsourcing to China aligned with that vision. We carried out a competitor analysis, looking at the three most well-known similar companies from an international perspective. We focused our analysis on price, strengths and weaknesses. The most well-known comparable concept is Medical Guardian which asks for a subscription price in the market and offers simple technology; followed by Lifefone, which has similar characteristics, but expects a long term contract commitment from customers. Bay Alarm Medical is the most expensive existing solution. It offers wide customization choices and is more than seventy years in the market. Our differentiation from these potential competitors are one-time payment, no contract requirements, free delivery and installation of software, and the fact that it would be the most interactive device on the market. After the competitive analysis and examining the possible target market, we defined our product as a high quality one-time payment product.

We had an opportunity to present a draft version of our concept prototype mid-week, to share what we had learnt from other groups. Our idea received overall positive comments. To illustrate clearly the problem we were trying to solve, we showed a social experiment video filmed in Russia that demonstrated the level of ignorance and even indifference of passersby in case of someone obviously not feeling well or collapsing in the street. This video emotionally connected with many viewers and stakeholders and illustrated well the high social importance of introducing our product to the Russian market. Once other groups had commented, we reviewed the remarks made by our BSL colleagues and implemented their feedback in the development of our prototype.

“Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity” Martin Luther King Jr.

We believe that in today’s world it is crucial to reduce ignorance and encourage the notion of people and communities helping each other on every level. Our device will not only potentially save lives, but it can also have a substantial impact by improving behavior and increasing empathy. Our concept will reduce the level of ignorance and, we feel, raise awareness such that more people will want to help each other in the long run.

BSL Gap Frame Innovation Week, Spring 2018: Is the world all set for MySet?

Blog by Dr. Aileen Ionescu-Somers with video blog by Student Group 2: Anastasiya Markova, Armen Danielyan, James Polit, Julia Bogle, Mathis Chailleux, Napat Suttaponga, Umar Kalanov, Vasily Zhuraviev, Victor Marinescu.

As promised, this is the first of several blogs relating to student output from our Spring Gap Frame Week 2018 prototyping exercise. We want our readers to share in the “buzz” that these weeks create within BSL. And we hope to inspire some of you also. Please refer to this article to understand more in detail what the BSL Gap Frame Week is all about. The short explanation is that the Gap Frame Week is an opportunity for our students to work on prototyping solutions and even start-ups addressing some of the world’s most formidable sustainability dilemmas. In Spring 2018, the students tackled social issues.

Of the eight groups that presented early prototypes of solutions to world social issues, an expert faculty panel on Day 5 felt that Group 2: MySet ticked many boxes in terms of the potential outreach and impact of the idea, if marketed carefully and in the right way.

So what is the concept idea that was prototyped, MySet, all about? In innovation, the best place to start is always with the problem the solution is trying to solve. Group 2 decided to address Education as the social issue worthy of their attention. Their research indicated that students in developing countries often do not have enough seating in their school classrooms. Small children often squeeze into cramped desks, several at a time, or even have to sit on the floor to attend their classes. India is a case in point where 75% of schools in rural areas have this problem. This leads to difficulties concentrating and learning, and even to longer-term physical problems since students are forced to sit in unnatural positions.

What proposed solution did Group 2 come up with? The MySet concept proposes an affordable, light, adjustable chair set made from recycled material. If marketed to the right target audience (obviously, since parents are too poor to afford such a solution, charitable foundations, NGOs and aid agencies would be an interesting target), MySet has the potential to be an interesting proposition. Clever idea. Let’s see how Group 2 does in developing this early prototype into a full blown start-up ready to attract investor interest, with a corresponding exhibition space during our next GFW in May.

The video blog produced by the Group 2 students listed above gives an idea of the journey they took to arrive at their final prototype. Click HERE to view; enjoy!

 

Ionescu-AileenPICTURE-150x150Author: Dr. Aileen Ionescu-Somers

Gap Frame Week designer and orchestrator

BSL and innovation: Does BSL’s Gap Frame Week create value for society?

At Business School Lausanne, we are proud to offer a highly dynamic Gap Frame Week (GFW) experience to our students four times a year. What does this mean, and what happens during these weeks? Well, you might be surprised to learn that our students work in teams to co-create solutions to the world’s most problematic social, environmental, economic and governance issues. Ambitious: yes!  A tough call: yes!  But no one ever said business school should be easy. As the GFW designer, I incorporate a variety of co-creative techniques including World Café and Collaboratories to get our students thinking “out of the box”, but I have also designed the week with a strong red thread of design thinking processes throughout to encourage open innovation and create an inspirational learning context.

Click HERE for a short video of our students in action during the BSL Gap Frame Week.

Design thinking is a process whereby we seek primarily to understand the people for whom we are designing products or services. Design thinking helps us to question “norms” or fixed mindsets, challenge assumptions about “what they want”, change levels of understanding in the innovation teams, and redefine problems in order to find a better fit between “the problem” and “the solution”.  Design thinking is not only a solutions-based approach to solving problems, but also a whole way of thinking and working in itself. It is a good choice for our BSL GFW innovation week because it is so useful in helping to tackle problems that are not very well defined or are even unknown. And since during the GFW, we are tackling problems that the world’s best minds have not yet resolved, we need all the help we can get!

During each Gap Frame week, our BSL students generate new matches between solutions and needs that truly create value for society. And who knows, maybe some will carry a brilliant business idea out of BSL and create value in the real world! We encouraged our students to write blogs recounting their experiences during the last GFW in Spring 2018, so that you too can have a taste of what the students achieve.  Some great examples will be showcased in a series of blogs leading up to our next GFW from 14 to 18 May, 2018. Keep reading our blogs over the next 4 weeks!

 

Ionescu-AileenPICTURE-150x150Author: Dr. Aileen Ionescu-Somers

Gap Frame Week designer and orchestrator